November 20, 2011

Thanksgiving Day Facts & Celebrations

Thanksgiving is an occasion when with our Family and Friends gathered under the same roof in beautifully decorated homes, we thank the Almighty for everything that mortals have been blessed with in life. Some of the facts regarding celebrations on this much anticipated occasion are as follow

ThanksGiving Day Celebration Facts

  • Thanksgiving or Thanksgiving Day, celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November. 
  • ThanksGiving Day has officially been an annual tradition in the United States since 1863, when during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of thanksgiving to be celebrated on Thursday, November 26. 
  • Thanksgiving is an occasion when with our Family and Friends gathered under the same roof in beautifully decorated homes, we thank the Almighty for everything that mortals have been blessed with in life
  • Exchanging gifts on this day is not part of the tradition. Nonetheless, it is not uncommon.
  • Thanksgiving is one of the "big six" major holidays of the year (along with Christmas, New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day). 
  • Together with Christmas and the New Year, Thanksgiving is a part of the broader holiday season, during this time, friends and family get together to share each other's company, exchange gifts, and eat lots of good food. A dinner, similar to what is served on Thanksgiving, is spread out for Christmas and New Year's Day as well. 

Some Awesome facts about First Thanks Giving Day and other historical developments: 




  • The event that Americans commonly call the "First Thanksgiving" was celebrated to give thanks to God for guiding them safely to the New World. 
  • The first Thanksgiving feast lasted three days, providing enough food for 13 Pilgrims and 90 Native Americans.
  • The feast consisted of fish (cod, eels, and bass) and shellfish (clams, lobster, and mussels), wild fowl (ducks, geese, swans, and turkey), venison, berries and fruit, vegetables (peas, pumpkin, beetroot and possibly, wild or cultivated onion), harvest grains (barley and wheat), and the Three Sisters: beans, dried Indian maize or corn, and squash.
  • The New England colonists were accustomed to regularly celebrating "thanksgivings"—days of prayer thanking God for blessings such as military victory or the end of a drought
  • Though many competing claims exist, the most familiar story of the first Thanksgiving took place in Plymouth Colony, in present-day Massachusetts, in 1621. 
  • More than 200 years after the First ThanksGiving Day, President Abraham Lincoln declared the final Thursday in November as a national day of thanksgiving. 
  • Congress finally made Thanksgiving Day an official national holiday in 1941. 
  • Sarah Josepha Hale, the enormously influential magazine editor and author who waged a tireless campaign to make Thanksgiving a national holiday in the mid-19th century, was also the author of the classic nursery rhyme "Mary Had a Little Lamb." 
  • Since 1947, The National Turkey Federation gives the President of the country one live and two dressed turkeys as gift. This ritual is known as the National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation.
  • In 2001, the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative Thanksgiving stamp. Designed by the artist Margaret Cusack in a style resembling traditional folk-art needlework, it depicted a cornucopia overflowing with fruits and vegetables, under the phrase "We Give Thanks." 
  • The American Automobile Association (AAA) estimated that 42.2 million Americans traveled 50 miles or more from home over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend in 2010.  
  • The National Turkey Federation estimated that 46 million turkeys—one fifth of the annual total of 235 million consumed in the United States in 2007—were eaten at Thanksgiving. In a survey conducted by the National Turkey Federation, nearly 88 percent of Americans said they eat turkey at Thanksgiving. The average weight of turkeys purchased for Thanksgiving is 15 pounds, which means some 690 million pounds of turkey were consumed in the U.S. during Thanksgiving in 2007. 
  • Three towns in the U.S. take their name from the traditional Thanksgiving bird, including Turkey, Texas (pop. 465); Turkey Creek, Louisiana (pop. 363); and Turkey, North Carolina (pop. 270). 

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

  • Macy's ThanksGiving Day Parade Facts: 
    • Originally known as Macy's Christmas Parade—to signify the launch of the Christmas shopping season—the first Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade took place in New York City in 1924. 
    • It was launched by Macy's employees and featured animals from the Central Park Zoo. 
    • Today, some 3 million people attend the annual parade and another 44 million watch it on television. 
    • Tony Sarg, a children's book illustrator and puppeteer, designed the first giant hot air balloons for the Macy's Thanksgiving
    • Day Parade in 1927. He later created the elaborate mechanically animated window displays that grace the façade of the New York store from Thanksgiving to Christmas. 
    • Snoopy has appeared as a giant balloon in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade more times than any other character in history. As the Flying Ace, Snoopy made his sixth appearance in the 2006 parade. 
  • National Thanks Giving Football Broadcast: 
    • The first time the Detroit Lions played football on Thanksgiving Day was in 1934, when they hosted the Chicago Bears at the University of Detroit stadium, in front of 26,000 fans. 
    • The NBC radio network broadcast the game on 94 stations across the country--the first national Thanksgiving football broadcast. 
    • Since that time, the Lions have played a game every Thanksgiving (except between 1939 and 1944); 
    • In 1956, fans watched the game on television for the first time.

ThanksGiving Day Football

ThanksGiving Celebrations - Food Facts: The Turkey, CrankBerry and Pumpkin pie Facts and everything else




  • Turkey is probably the most traditional part of this harvest festival. Thanksgiving Day is often referred to as Turkey Day for the very same reason.
  • As mentioned above The National Turkey Federation estimated that 46 million turkeys—one fifth of the annual total of 235 million consumed in the United States in 2007—were eaten at Thanksgiving. In a survey conducted by the National Turkey Federation, nearly 88 percent of Americans said they eat turkey at Thanksgiving. The average weight of turkeys purchased for Thanksgiving is 15 pounds, which means some 690 million pounds of turkey were consumed in the U.S. during Thanksgiving in 2007. 
  • According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Minnesota is the top turkey-producing state in America, with a planned production total of 46.5 million in 2011. Six states—Minnesota, North Carolina, Arkansas, Missouri, Virginia, and Indinia—account for nearly two-thirds of the  248 million turkeys that will be raised in the U.S. this year. 
  • The turkey is stuffed with ingredients like stuffing,chopped onions,carrots and celery, and the traditional herb sage. This is then roasted, and placed at the center of the dinner table, ready to be cut into portions for everyone.
  • Many households serve ducks, geese, or chicken instead of turkey. And for those who are vegetarian, they have the option of tofu with turkey flavoring to savor the authenticity of a real one. 
  • Other dishes that are commonly served with the turkey are mashed and sweet potatoes, Waldorf salad, gravy, and cranberries. For dessert, there is the quintessential Thanksgiving pumpkin pie, apple, or chocolate meringue pie. Among drinks, apple cider or wine can be served as well.
  • Cranberry production in the U.S. is expected to reach 750 million pounds in 2011. Wisconsin, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon and Washington are the top cranberry growing states. Illinois, California, Pennsylvania and New York are the major pumpkin growing states, together they produced 1.1 billion pounds of pumpkin in 2010. Total U.S. production was over 1.5 billion pounds. 
  • The sweet potato is most plentifully produced in North Carolina, which grew 972 million pounds of the popular Thanksgiving side dish vegetable in 2010. Other sweet potato powerhouses included California and Mississippi, and the top producing states together generated over 2.4 billion pounds of the tubers. 
  • According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the largest pumpkin pie ever baked weighed 2,020 pounds and measured just over 12 feet long. It was baked on October 8, 2005 by the New Bremen Giant Pumpkin Growers in Ohio, and included 900 pounds of pumpkin, 62 gallons of evaporated milk, 155 dozen eggs, 300 pounds of sugar, 3.5 pounds of salt, 7 pounds of cinnamon, 2 pounds of pumpkin spice and 250 pounds of crust.  

ThanksGiving Celebration Global Facts:

  • Canada: Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday of October every year in Canada. It dates back to Martin Frobisher, who celebrated it in 1578 out of appreciation for having survived his journey trying to find a northern passage to the Orient.
  • Europe: European farmers observed Thanksgiving for good harvest. They stuffed a goat's horn with the harvested grains symbolically known as cornucopia or the Horn of Plenty. This ritual was carried on when they arrived in Canada. 
  • US: In the United States Thanksgiving is celebrated as a legal one-day holiday every year on the fourth Thursday of November. When the Pilgrims first came to Plymouth Plantation,the Native American tribes like that of Wampanoag taught them how to yield crops for a living. Hence, the former celebrated Thanksgiving as a prayer for a good harvest.
  • Harvest festivals are not restricted to Canada and North America. The Tamil festival of Pongal, the Jewish festival of Sukkot, and Ikore celebrated in Nigeria are just some of the rituals similar to Thanksgiving Day.  

ThanksGiving Prayers:

  • Before starting the meal, the head of the family says a prayer, commonly known as grace,thanking God for the food that is spread before everyone. 
  • Guests can also contribute to the prayer if they wish to. 
  • A traditional family Thanksgiving prayer would be: Jesus, thank you for loving us; And providing food, shelter, and each other. Every moment of our lives is a gift; And we appreciate all the time You have given us. Thank you for all our good fortune. Amen.

On the lighter note... watch this ! Hope you have a great Thanks Giving ! And yes... THANKYOU for visiting vabsite.com !


Top Thanksgiving Mobile Apps

 1. Chow: Thanksgiving Dinner Coach

This app makes preparing for the big day as easy as pumpkin pie.  It has step-by-step tutorials (with pictures) on how to roast that turkey and how to perfect that gravy. It even creates a shopping list of items you will need and a cooking timer depending on the size of your bird.

2. Whack Turkey

For Whack A Mole lovers everywhere, this app has you utilizing both of your pointer fingers to smash down some pesky turkeys.

3. TGIBlack Friday

From Ace Hardware to Walmart this app has deals searchable from store to category. You can add items to a shopping list or post it to your Facebook wall to spread the love. Equipped with pictures and slashed out numbers to prove your deal, it has a bit of everything for the frugalista in all of us.

4. ProFlowers

This app makes it easy for a loved one to pick out a bundle of multicolored, diverse arrangements from a list.

5. Thanksgiving Dinner Maker

Not able to call the shots for your own Thanksgiving feast this year? Now you can with this virtual table setting. From picking the tablecloth to the main course, you are the boss.

Race the clock as you attempt to pluck layers of feathers off of a virtual turkey. Yes, he gobbles.

For the kid in all of us -- this app has a range of images to color or paint, from Native Americans to steaming platters of turkey.

Then, rather than hanging it on the refrigerator, you can save it and post to Facebook or Twitter.

The Packers, Lions, Dolphins, Cowboys, 49ers and Ravens all have something in common this Thanksgiving day -- a game to play.

Get updates on the latest scores and plays under the table while you enjoy your meal

Stuck travelling this holiday season? Make sure you get the cheapest prices on gasoline. This app automatically finding your location, then lists off the closest gas stations and current prices.

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